Personality and Leadership: Implications for Emotional Well-being

04/01/2017

Chris Sietstra
Mentor: Dr. Laird Edman
Department of Psychology

Pursuant to research suggested by Dr. Julian Barling and Dr. Anita Cloutier, the current study responds to the call to pay more careful attention and give greater research focus to the emotional wellness of leaders. Leaders were sampled from a small, Midwest town and college. Results indicated a desperate need for more diversified leadership. A preliminary indication was also found suggesting that special attention be directed towards those utilizing a passive leadership style as there was a strong negative correlation to emotional well-being in participants whose primary leadership style is passive.